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Archive for the ‘Articles’ Category

Web trends for 2010

Hi everyone!

A quick post to wish everyone a good end of year break, and to let you know to check back with us in the new year for updates to the discussion papers section on our Resources page.

Leaving you now with a CNN article looking at some web trends for the coming year: “10 Web Trends to Watch in 2010”.  You might foresee some interesting implications for libraries here.

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A recent news story in the technology sector identifies Queensland’s Griffith University as being one of the first to use Twitter as a tool for assessing students:

…About 340 first-year Griffith University journalism students have to Tweet ongoing assessment pieces this semester.

Lecturer Dr Jacqui Ewart said she understood Griffith to be the first university to use the social media tool to test students.

“We thought it was important to introduce it because increasingly employers are asking employees to use these kind of (social networking) mechanisms and marketing and promotional devices,” Dr Ewart said…

The lecturers in the article acknowledge the importance of using social media tools not just in response to industry demand for specific skills, but also because they are seen as a useful way to incorporate professional networking activity into the curriculum.

You can read the full article online here: “Griffith University journalism students to be marked on tweets”.

Are these the kinds of things that we would find beneficial to incorporate into LIS degrees as well?

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CNN has an interesting article looking at the ways in which libraries and librarians are continuing to evolve in response to increased digitisation of information and use of social technologies.  Highlights include:

Library 2.0…

People used to go online for the same information they could get from newspapers. Now they go to Facebook, Digg and Twitter to discuss their lives and the news of the day. Forward-looking librarians are trying to create that same conversational loop in public libraries. The one-way flow of information from book to patron isn’t good enough anymore…

Community Centers…

Jason M. Schultz, director of the Samuelson Law, Technology and Public Policy Clinic at the University of California at Berkeley Law School, said libraries always have served two roles in society: They’re places where people can get free information; and they’re community centers for civic debate.
As books become more available online, that community-center role will become increasingly important for libraries, he said…

Librarians…

This shift means the role of the librarian — and their look — is also changing.
In a world where information is more social and more online, librarians are becoming debate moderators, givers of technical support and community outreach coordinators…

And finally…

“I came into libraries and it wasn’t about books,” said Peter Norman, a graduate student in library and information science at Simmons College in Boston who says he’s most interested in music and technology. “Sure I love to read. I read all the time. I read physical books. But I don’t have the strange emotional attachment that some people possess.”
“If the library is going to turn into a place without books, I’m going to evolve with that too,” he said.

Click here to read the full article: “The future of libraries, with or without books”.

What do you think?  Are you seeing the same kinds of changes in your own libraries?  You might like to post a comment on our “Librarian 2.0?” page if you haven’t already done so!

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Several articles that may be of interest to readers have recently been made available by Stephen Abram on his blog, Stephen’s Lighthouse:

“The New Normal” appeared as an April/May column for Information Outlook, and in it Stephen talks about some of the things that have become ‘normal’ to him now in special libraries, including social networking, collaboration, tagging and blogging.  Read the full article here.

“Blogging as a Special Librarian” is Stephen’s June column for Information Outlook, and offers “some personal and practical advice on blogging for special librarians and information professionals”.  The full article is accessible here.

Finally, “Preparing for the New Media Literacies” appeared in the March/April edition of Multimedia and Internet @ Schools, and here Stephen looks at some of the ways that the consumption of media is changing in society.  He suggests ways of creating news literacies via things like:

  • an exploration of blogs and the concept of ‘voice’
  • contrasting YouTube reportage to mainstream media
  • finding podcasts and comparing it to radio circa 1964 and 1984 and 2004
  • [examining] the role of collaborative tagging and news feeds

Read the full article here.  You might recall that the idea of ‘literacy 2.0’ skills was touched upon in an earlier post as a possible area of importance for librarians in the web 2.0 age.

You can find more of Stephen’s articles on his blog at: http://stephenslighthouse.sirsidynix.com/

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For anybody wanting to become more familiar with the ways that microblogging service Twitter is being used by libraries and librarians, an article in the May edition of Computers in Libraries by Sarah Milstein gives a brief overview:

For many people, the word “twitter” brings to mind birds rather than humans. But information professionals know that Twitter (www.twitter.com) is a fast-growing, free messaging service for people, and it’s one that libraries (and librarians) can make good use of—without spending much time or effort…

You can read the free full-text version of the article, “Twitter for Libraries (and Librarians)” here.

You can also read about some of the ways that Twitter is being incorporated into real-life educational settings (albeit in this case not for LIS education), for example by reading about the respective classroom experiences of Monica Rankin and David Parry, both from the University of Texas at Dallas.

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A recent article in Campus Review talks about some of the ways that academic libraries (and consequently librarians) are changing in response to increased digitisation of resources.  From the article:

The next generation of professional librarians are enrolled in information management degrees. They need to be given the explosion in digital information, reports Jeremy Gilling.

The information revolution has transformed the world of libraries. Books are still borrowed, though in decreasing numbers, while information is increasingly held in electronic form. Librarians’ role now is to guide students and staff through an increasingly self-service environment, and spaces are being redesigned to facilitate this process…

Click here to read the full Campus Review article “It’s bigger than just libraries”.

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