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Web 2.0 fast facts

Just for fun, here are some web 2.0 ‘fast facts’ that demonstrate the increasing popularity of online social technologies both in Australia and worldwide:

  • 76% of online Australian adults regularly use social technologies (Source: Forrester)
  • Approximately 30% of Australians have their own blog (Source: Universal McCann)
  • Australia is currently the fourth biggest Twitter-using country (Source: Sysomos)
  • There are around 37,500 new blog posts per hour (or 10.4 new posts per second) (Soure: Technorati)
  • More than 5 billion minutes are spent on Facebook each day worldwide (Source: Facebook)
  • 13 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube per minute (Source: Google)
  • There are around 3 million new Twitter messages or ‘tweets’ per day (Source: TechCrunch)
  • The total time spent on social media sites has increased 82% in the last year (Source: Nielsen)

An article has just been published in the newest issue of the Journal of Documentation that attempts to answer the question “What is library 2.0?” from the perspective of library professionals.  (For those without access to the journal you can check out a related presentation here.)

Researchers from Åbo Akademi University in Finland used a technique that identifies trends based on the co-occurrence of words, as library professionals attempted to explain what ‘library 2.0’ means to them.

The researchers were able to map out seven core concepts or “building blocks” that they believe define library 2.0 from a professional perspective.  These seven identified components of library 2.0 are represented in the image below:

The building blocks of library 2.0

The Building Blocks of Library 2.0 [image taken from http://library2pointoh.fi/]

The researchers could then use these core building blocks to provide their own empirically-based definition of library 2.0:

“Library 2.0 is a change in interaction between users and libraries in a new culture of participation catalysed by social web technologies.”

As you can see, this definition coincides with many previous ideas about library 2.0 and the notion that it is about more than just the technology – rather it is about what the technology is allowing us to do.  Some would even say that technology is not essential to a definition of library 2.0 at all.  What do you think?

Of course this would also mean that ‘librarian 2.0’ will be about more than just the technological skills as well.  Is technology necessary to define your idea of librarian 2.0?  Opinions are very welcome on our “Librarian 2.0?” page as always, so if you haven’t yet visited you might like to do so!

You can find out more about the work of the Finnish researchers above by checking out their blog (in English): Library 2.0: A new participatory context.

JISC Netskills this month made public a preview of several web 2.0 animations created as part of a new Web2practice project, recently announced at the JISC Conference 2009.  The project aims to provide educators and professionals with online guides and resources to enable them to learn more about the benefits of web 2.0 technologies for their work practices.  Not only will professionals be able to use the resources provided to enhance their own understanding of web 2.0 tools, but – true to the spirit of web 2.0 – they will be able to share and remix content for purposes such as staff development and creating their own training and teaching aids.

Currently the project has animated videos available for topics such as social media, microblogging, podcasting and RSS, with more to be released in the coming months.  The videos will eventually be accompanied by editable guides and other resources free to be downloaded and adapted under a creative commons licence.

You can hear more about the project in the slidecast below:

Click to play slidecast

Overview of the Web2practice Project by Will Allen and Steve Boneham of JISC Netskills

Available project resources can be accessed by heading to the Web2practice project website.

Several articles that may be of interest to readers have recently been made available by Stephen Abram on his blog, Stephen’s Lighthouse:

“The New Normal” appeared as an April/May column for Information Outlook, and in it Stephen talks about some of the things that have become ‘normal’ to him now in special libraries, including social networking, collaboration, tagging and blogging.  Read the full article here.

“Blogging as a Special Librarian” is Stephen’s June column for Information Outlook, and offers “some personal and practical advice on blogging for special librarians and information professionals”.  The full article is accessible here.

Finally, “Preparing for the New Media Literacies” appeared in the March/April edition of Multimedia and Internet @ Schools, and here Stephen looks at some of the ways that the consumption of media is changing in society.  He suggests ways of creating news literacies via things like:

  • an exploration of blogs and the concept of ‘voice’
  • contrasting YouTube reportage to mainstream media
  • finding podcasts and comparing it to radio circa 1964 and 1984 and 2004
  • [examining] the role of collaborative tagging and news feeds

Read the full article here.  You might recall that the idea of ‘literacy 2.0’ skills was touched upon in an earlier post as a possible area of importance for librarians in the web 2.0 age.

You can find more of Stephen’s articles on his blog at: http://stephenslighthouse.sirsidynix.com/

Some upcoming presentations have now been added to the blog (see the Resources page for a complete list of presentations):

Spotlight on users

An interesting video from Aarhus Public Libraries in Denmark is a good example of how ‘library 2.0’ can be seen as being about more than just the technology.  Here the Aarhus Main Library’s focus is on involving the users in order to cater to their needs; user collaboration and participatory design in libraries is encouraged.

From the video: “In the new library, user-driven innovation will be part of the daily work. The user’s needs are in focus.”

Click to play video

Unleash the Users by transformationlab

For those who are interested, you can read more about the concept of user-driven innovation and the Aarhus Main Library in the report “The Library’s Voice: A Guide to User-driven Innovation”, available as an ePaper or PDF in both Danish and English from http://www.aakb.dk/sw135335.asp

As LIS professionals in Australia, are we headed in a similar direction?

For anybody wanting to become more familiar with the ways that microblogging service Twitter is being used by libraries and librarians, an article in the May edition of Computers in Libraries by Sarah Milstein gives a brief overview:

For many people, the word “twitter” brings to mind birds rather than humans. But information professionals know that Twitter (www.twitter.com) is a fast-growing, free messaging service for people, and it’s one that libraries (and librarians) can make good use of—without spending much time or effort…

You can read the free full-text version of the article, “Twitter for Libraries (and Librarians)” here.

You can also read about some of the ways that Twitter is being incorporated into real-life educational settings (albeit in this case not for LIS education), for example by reading about the respective classroom experiences of Monica Rankin and David Parry, both from the University of Texas at Dallas.