Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘australia’

A recent news story in the technology sector identifies Queensland’s Griffith University as being one of the first to use Twitter as a tool for assessing students:

…About 340 first-year Griffith University journalism students have to Tweet ongoing assessment pieces this semester.

Lecturer Dr Jacqui Ewart said she understood Griffith to be the first university to use the social media tool to test students.

“We thought it was important to introduce it because increasingly employers are asking employees to use these kind of (social networking) mechanisms and marketing and promotional devices,” Dr Ewart said…

The lecturers in the article acknowledge the importance of using social media tools not just in response to industry demand for specific skills, but also because they are seen as a useful way to incorporate professional networking activity into the curriculum.

You can read the full article online here: “Griffith University journalism students to be marked on tweets”.

Are these the kinds of things that we would find beneficial to incorporate into LIS degrees as well?

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Web 2.0 fast facts

Just for fun, here are some web 2.0 ‘fast facts’ that demonstrate the increasing popularity of online social technologies both in Australia and worldwide:

  • 76% of online Australian adults regularly use social technologies (Source: Forrester)
  • Approximately 30% of Australians have their own blog (Source: Universal McCann)
  • Australia is currently the fourth biggest Twitter-using country (Source: Sysomos)
  • There are around 37,500 new blog posts per hour (or 10.4 new posts per second) (Soure: Technorati)
  • More than 5 billion minutes are spent on Facebook each day worldwide (Source: Facebook)
  • 13 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube per minute (Source: Google)
  • There are around 3 million new Twitter messages or ‘tweets’ per day (Source: TechCrunch)
  • The total time spent on social media sites has increased 82% in the last year (Source: Nielsen)

Read Full Post »

A recent article in Campus Review talks about some of the ways that academic libraries (and consequently librarians) are changing in response to increased digitisation of resources.  From the article:

The next generation of professional librarians are enrolled in information management degrees. They need to be given the explosion in digital information, reports Jeremy Gilling.

The information revolution has transformed the world of libraries. Books are still borrowed, though in decreasing numbers, while information is increasingly held in electronic form. Librarians’ role now is to guide students and staff through an increasingly self-service environment, and spaces are being redesigned to facilitate this process…

Click here to read the full Campus Review article “It’s bigger than just libraries”.

Read Full Post »

A press release about upcoming research on the evaluation of Learning 2.0 programs in Australian libraries:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

US LEARNING 2.0 RESEARCHER DR MICHAEL STEPHENS APPOINTED 2009 CAVAL VISITING SCHOLAR

Melbourne, 30 March 2009 – Internationally recognised US Web 2.0 commentator, writer and library academic, Dr Michael Stephens, has been appointed the 2009 CAVAL Visiting Scholar.

In a world first for CAVAL and its project partners CityLibraries Townsville and Dominican University Graduate School of Library and Information Science, Dr Stephens’ research project will seek to measure the value and effect of Learning 2.0 programs in Australian libraries.

“The intent of this study is to understand the impact on library staff and institutional culture and makeup after a Learning 2.0 program”, Dr Stephens says.

“The critical questions for libraries looking forward are to what extent has Learning 2.0 impacted institutional culture and staff confidence, and to what degree has it improved the ability of library staff to use emerging technologies?”

Dr Stephens notes that “More than 500 libraries in 15 countries have implemented Learning 2.0 programs in 2 years but we know very little about their effectiveness.”

“Nearly 10% of these Learning 2.0 programs are Australian, ranging from large State and University libraries through to public and special libraries and a small school library in New South Wales.”

First developed by the Public Library of Charlotte Mecklenburg County under a Creative Commons license in 2006, Learning 2.0 is an online learning program that encourages library staff to explore and learn about emerging Web 2.0 technologies.  Web 2.0, also called the Read/Write Web or Social Computing, enables users of all ages and walks of life to create, change and publish their own Web content.  Blogs and social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook are common examples.

Working with a co-researcher from CityLibraries Townsville, Dr Stephens’
research aims to develop a world first model for what he terms “an exemplary Learning 2.0 program for Australian libraries.”

For Dr Stephens’ acclaimed Tame the Web blog, visit http://tametheweb.com/

For more information about the original Learning 2.0 program, visit http://plcmcl2-about.blogspot.com/

ABOUT THE PROJECT PARTNERS:

CAVAL is an Australian not-for-profit company established in 1978 to support leading libraries in Australia, New Zealand and Asia.  CAVAL is owned jointly by 11 Australian universities and provides a range of specialised services to the library sector including storage and digital preservation, training and consulting.

Dominican University’s Graduate School of Library and Information Science was founded in 1930 and has grown to become one of the United States’ largest Masters of Library and Information Science degree-granting programs.  More than 600 students attend classes in River Forest and the Greater Chicago area.

CityLibraries Townsville was formed by the merger of the Townsville City Council and Thuringowa City Council in March 2008.  Three library branches, mobile services plus a virtual branch serve the whole of Townsville – from the inner city to Magnetic Island, from the suburbs to the rural communities.  Each branch offers specialist services and facilities that provide for a diverse community.

CONTACT:

Richard Sayers
Director, Capability Development
CAVAL
+61 7 3491 7021
richard.sayers@caval.edu.au
www.caval.edu.au/

– END –

Source

Read Full Post »