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Posts Tagged ‘librarian 2.0’

Both entertaining and enlightening, the Library 101 project has just been launched by David Lee King and Michael Porter.  Aimed at inspiring us to integrate past, present and future librarian skills in order to continue thriving in a changing environment, the project is collaborative and ongoing.  Check out their ‘music video’ below for a fun introduction to their idea:

Library 101 by David Lee King and Michael Porter

Do be sure to check out their list for 100+ past, present and future skills for the profession, many of which could easily apply to librarian 2.0.  A very thorough and thought-provoking list!

You can check out an interesting assortment of essays from library professionals on the website as well.  Happy reading!

If you find something that you feel is important (or lacking) for librarian 2.0 skills and knowledge then we would love to know about it – we’ve been discussing similar ideas on our “Librarian 2.0?” page.

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Hi everyone,

Discussion Papers I and II are now available to download on our Resources page.  These give a good overview of the project and preliminary findings so far, so be sure to check them out!  Comments, thoughts, and opinions are all very welcome and encouraged, so please do let us know what you think.

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CNN has an interesting article looking at the ways in which libraries and librarians are continuing to evolve in response to increased digitisation of information and use of social technologies.  Highlights include:

Library 2.0…

People used to go online for the same information they could get from newspapers. Now they go to Facebook, Digg and Twitter to discuss their lives and the news of the day. Forward-looking librarians are trying to create that same conversational loop in public libraries. The one-way flow of information from book to patron isn’t good enough anymore…

Community Centers…

Jason M. Schultz, director of the Samuelson Law, Technology and Public Policy Clinic at the University of California at Berkeley Law School, said libraries always have served two roles in society: They’re places where people can get free information; and they’re community centers for civic debate.
As books become more available online, that community-center role will become increasingly important for libraries, he said…

Librarians…

This shift means the role of the librarian — and their look — is also changing.
In a world where information is more social and more online, librarians are becoming debate moderators, givers of technical support and community outreach coordinators…

And finally…

“I came into libraries and it wasn’t about books,” said Peter Norman, a graduate student in library and information science at Simmons College in Boston who says he’s most interested in music and technology. “Sure I love to read. I read all the time. I read physical books. But I don’t have the strange emotional attachment that some people possess.”
“If the library is going to turn into a place without books, I’m going to evolve with that too,” he said.

Click here to read the full article: “The future of libraries, with or without books”.

What do you think?  Are you seeing the same kinds of changes in your own libraries?  You might like to post a comment on our “Librarian 2.0?” page if you haven’t already done so!

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Bloggers from Follow the Reader have posted a recent interview with two library professionals about how they are perceiving some of the challenges of the digital age for libraries.  From the blog post:

As digital publishing options become more and more prevalent, libraries of all kinds are working to incorporate digital into their collections and service offerings. This is no easy task, and libraries face plenty of obstacles as they gear up for the digital age. To get a bit of insight about how some libraries and librarians seem to be dealing with the changes of “Library 2.0,” we spoke with Kathy Ishizuka, the technology editor of School Library Journal, and Shayera Tangri, a branch manager for the Los Angeles Public Library…

Click here to read the rest of the post and the interview: “Libraries (and Librarians): Braving the Digital Age”.

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An article has just been published in the newest issue of the Journal of Documentation that attempts to answer the question “What is library 2.0?” from the perspective of library professionals.  (For those without access to the journal you can check out a related presentation here.)

Researchers from Åbo Akademi University in Finland used a technique that identifies trends based on the co-occurrence of words, as library professionals attempted to explain what ‘library 2.0’ means to them.

The researchers were able to map out seven core concepts or “building blocks” that they believe define library 2.0 from a professional perspective.  These seven identified components of library 2.0 are represented in the image below:

The building blocks of library 2.0

The Building Blocks of Library 2.0 [image taken from http://library2pointoh.fi/]

The researchers could then use these core building blocks to provide their own empirically-based definition of library 2.0:

“Library 2.0 is a change in interaction between users and libraries in a new culture of participation catalysed by social web technologies.”

As you can see, this definition coincides with many previous ideas about library 2.0 and the notion that it is about more than just the technology – rather it is about what the technology is allowing us to do.  Some would even say that technology is not essential to a definition of library 2.0 at all.  What do you think?

Of course this would also mean that ‘librarian 2.0’ will be about more than just the technological skills as well.  Is technology necessary to define your idea of librarian 2.0?  Opinions are very welcome on our “Librarian 2.0?” page as always, so if you haven’t yet visited you might like to do so!

You can find out more about the work of the Finnish researchers above by checking out their blog (in English): Library 2.0: A new participatory context.

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Some upcoming presentations have now been added to the blog (see the Resources page for a complete list of presentations):

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For anybody wanting to become more familiar with the ways that microblogging service Twitter is being used by libraries and librarians, an article in the May edition of Computers in Libraries by Sarah Milstein gives a brief overview:

For many people, the word “twitter” brings to mind birds rather than humans. But information professionals know that Twitter (www.twitter.com) is a fast-growing, free messaging service for people, and it’s one that libraries (and librarians) can make good use of—without spending much time or effort…

You can read the free full-text version of the article, “Twitter for Libraries (and Librarians)” here.

You can also read about some of the ways that Twitter is being incorporated into real-life educational settings (albeit in this case not for LIS education), for example by reading about the respective classroom experiences of Monica Rankin and David Parry, both from the University of Texas at Dallas.

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